Out of Prison, and Staying Out, After 3rd Strike in California

Out of Prison, and Staying Out, After 3rd Strike in California

March 3, 2015 | by Erik Eckholm | The New York Times

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In California, recidivism rates have dropped to less than 5% (about a tenth of the state average) among the more than 2,000 people released from prison through Proposition 36. Both strong reentry support services and the increasing age of those released has contributed to the minimal recidivism, as described in this article.

In California, recidivism rates have dropped to less than 5% (about a tenth of the state average) among the more than 2,000 people released from prison through Proposition 36. Both strong reentry support services and the increasing age of those released has contributed to the minimal recidivism, as described in this article. Proposition 36 was recently passed in response to dropping crime rates and prison overcrowding, meaning those sentenced through the three-strikes law whose third offenses were not violent or serious became eligible for resentencing if they were not deemed an “unreasonable risk of danger to public safety.” As more people are released and recidivism and crime continue to drop, the case to reduce minimum sentencing laws like the three-strikes law grows even stronger.

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