NCCD Marks the Celebration of the World Day of Social Justice

NCCD Marks the Celebration of the World Day of Social Justice

February 20, 2013 | by 

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Social justice is one of NCCD’s core values. We are committed to promoting a society that is based on the principles of equality and fairness, that values human rights, and that recognizes the dignity of every human being. Reform and system change are needed in order to ensure that all people have access to equal economic, political, and social opportunities.

Social justice is one of NCCD’s core values. We are committed to promoting a society that is based on the principles of equality and fairness, that values human rights, and that recognizes the dignity of every human being. Reform and system change are needed in order to ensure that all people have access to equal economic, political, and social opportunities.

February 20th, 2013 marks the celebration of the World Day of Social Justice, proclaimed for the first time by the United Nation’s general assembly in 2007. On this day, the United Nations invites its Member States to devote 24 hours to promoting national activities in accordance with the objectives and goals of the World Summit for Social Development.

In order to honor this day, NCCD staff described what social justice means to them. Here’s what they said:

 

“In child protection, we devote at least as much resource to helping parents safely parent their children as we do separating children from their parents and raising them elsewhere.”

“Working in the nonprofit sector to address social justice–how history has generated social hierarchies that make life more difficult for some than otherwise would be–feels and has always felt both intellectual and right. Social justice is about acknowledging the power that you have to help the oppressed, but it’s also about helping the self sleep better at night.”

I think that the greatest social injustice occurs when a child is abused or neglected, through no fault of their own. And then that child enters a system that is designed to help them, but that system doesn’t consistently help them. That’s what drives my work at NCCD–to do my part to help ensure that children’s and youths’ safety, well-being, and permanency needs are consistently met.”

“If you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem!”

“Social justice occurs when the pursuit of the individual no longer undermines the pursuit of universal equity, but instead works to actualize it.”

“Social injustice begins when prejudices and biases cloud one’s humanity. For me, social justice is just the opposite. When people can look past their own individuality, their own lived experiences, their prejudices, biases, and beliefs, and find that spot of humanity that opens up their soul and allows them to see the plight of who society has deemed the least among us, that is when social justice can begin to take form. Social justice is not merely about social, economical, political, or religious freedom and equality. Social justice is about voice; who “we” decide has a voice and “we” decide is silenced. I fight for social justice because I fight for voice. I fight for those who have been silenced, marginalized, and degraded. When their voice is heard, recognized, and counted, that is when we can heal our communities.”

“Social justice is the principle that all people deserve the same opportunities for economic, political, and social rights. The most vulnerable in our population are at the most risk for not having those opportunities. Our work to minimize their risks and increase their assets improves their access to the rights that most of us take for granted.”

“Social justice is the practice of equity across difference. Access to health care, education, employment, nutritious food, fair and equal working conditions, should not be limited to any person regardless of nationality, race, gender identification, sexual orientation, or class. Social justice is not widely practiced in the United States and has resulted in tremendous social problems and disparities. The criminal justice system is but one example of how social injustice manifests. I am devoted to la lucha (the fight) against the injustices that are pervasively affecting those locked inside this system and their families. The more you know, the more you owe!”

“Social justice involves each person and each society living with awareness of the impact of their actions on others—treating others both individually and collectively as you would have them treat you as an individual and as a member of society.”

“Social justice will be achieved when each human being is first recognized, understood, and valued equally by all and second, has equal access to wanted and needed resources and third and most importantly, is afforded the political power to effect change. In the meantime, those with privilege must advocate for the rights of those oppressed to be recognized and upheld.”


“Social justice is not a single event or outcome, it’s a series of processes over a long journey. I have been committed to and will continue to work hard to challenge the hegemonic messaging of what “good” parenting is and eliminate the (often unintentional) dehumanizing and cyclical nature of the foster care system.”