‘Jane’ Didn’t Get the Help She Needed: When the Juvenile Justice System Isn’t the Answer

July 2, 2014 | by Nicholas Kristof | The New York Times

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In this New York Times op-ed, Nicholas Kristof discusses the case of “Jane Doe,” a 16 year old who ended up in prison after a history of abuse and abandonment. Referencing research by Dr. Anna Aizer and Dr. Joseph J.

In this New York Times op-ed, Nicholas Kristof discusses the case of “Jane Doe,” a 16 year old who ended up in prison after a history of abuse and abandonment. Referencing research by Dr. Anna Aizer and Dr. Joseph J. Doyle on the deleterious effect of juvenile incarceration, Kristof makes the point that it would be economically efficient and more humane to invest in alternatives to incarceration for our youth. Kristof suggests alternatives such as home visitation for at-risk families, lead abatement, early education, and schools for low-income children that are as good as those for the middle class.
 
Dr. Anna Aizer and Dr. Joseph J. Doyle are winners of the 2014 Baird Award for Outstanding Applied Research.
 
To learn more about NCCD’s work in juvenile justice, click here. To learn about our youth deincarceration research, click here.