High Pay a Costly Legacy of Calif. Prison Receiver

High Pay a Costly Legacy of Calif. Prison Receiver

October 19, 2012 | by Don Thompson | ABC News

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In 2006, a California judge appointed an overseer, called a receiver, to control the salaries of medical professionals in the prison system. Since then, the receiver’s decisions have gone unchecked, causing compensation for prison medical staff to soar. Although doctors and nurses in prison systems are highly paid to compensate for the safety risks they face, many argue that the salaries that these professionals are earning are still higher than necessary and a waste of taxpayer funds.    

In 2006, a California judge appointed an overseer, called a receiver, to control the salaries of medical professionals in the prison system. Since then, the receiver’s decisions have gone unchecked, causing compensation for prison medical staff to soar. Although doctors and nurses in prison systems are highly paid to compensate for the safety risks they face, many argue that the salaries that these professionals are earning are still higher than necessary and a waste of taxpayer funds.