Childhood Maltreatment Can Leave Scars In the Brain

November 4, 2013 | by Jon Hamilton | NPR

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NPR’s “All Things Considered” discusses recent research on the connection between child abuse and brain development. A study from the University of Wisconsin has found that maltreatment in childhood can lead to long-term changes in the way the brain processes fear, making these children much more likely to develop anxiety and depressive symptoms by late adolescence. These studies represent progress in a national effort to find objective tests to diagnose and treat mental problems in children who have been maltreated.

NPR’s “All Things Considered” discusses recent research on the connection between child abuse and brain development. A study from the University of Wisconsin has found that maltreatment in childhood can lead to long-term changes in the way the brain processes fear, making these children much more likely to develop anxiety and depressive symptoms by late adolescence. These studies represent progress in a national effort to find objective tests to diagnose and treat mental problems in children who have been maltreated.

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